Lesson 6

January 27, 2009

Old Testament Survey
Kings – The United Kingdom
1 & 2 Samuel / 1 & 2 Chronicles

Review
Creation    –       Patriarchs        –  Egypt       –    Exodus    –   Land    –     Judges
(250 +/- yrs)        (400 yrs)       (40 yrs)       (30 yrs)      (350 yrs)
<-      Genesis, Job?   ->         <-Exodus – Deut         ->   <-Joshua-> <-Judges, Ruth->

The United Kingdom Timeline 1 & 2 Samuel / 1 & 2 Chronicles

Samuel   –              Saul   –              David   –           Solomon
(40 yrs)               (40 yrs)               (40 yrs)

Key Events
1.    The era of Judges ends with Samuel.  He was the last judge and also a prophet.
2.    Israel asks for and receives a King.
3.    Saul is the first king of Israel – he is soon rejected by God due to his sins.
4.    David is the great king of Israel – he is a type of Christ even though he falls into many sins.
5.    Jerusalem is set as capital (2 Samuel 5:6-10).
6.    Solomon is king of Israel – he is a peaceful king who compromises a holy life in his later years.
7.    The Temple is conceived by David and built by Solomon.

David – Type of Christ
•    In the life of David we get the first major glimpse of what the Messiah will be like.
•    Lineage from Judah yet Gentiles grafted in (Moabite great grandmother, Ruth, Canaanite great-great grandmother, Rahab).
•    Chosen by God – 1 Samuel 16:1
•    Man after God’s own heart – 1 Sam. 16:7
•    Covenant made with him (Davidic Covenant – 2 Sam. 7:13-16).  He would have a throne forever.
•    Slew enemies of Israel
•    Persecuted
•    Flight to and from Jerusalem

How the Sin of Kings was Handled
1.    Saul’s sin = taking on the role of priest and offering burnt offerings (1 Sam. 13:1-15) & not obeying the Lord completely by not destroying all the Amalekites and their property (1 Sam. 15).
2.    David’s sin = Adultery/murder (2 Sam. 11) and counting Israel (2 Sam. 24).
3.    Why the different treatment?
a.    Different hearts – Saul didn’t care about (despised) the Lord’s commands and David did care.  Their sins and type of repentance (or lack of) revealed their heart before God.  David was known as a “Man after God’s heart.”  This is seen even in the way he repented after he fell into sin.
b.    God did not reject Saul because of the sin.  The sin of Saul was a demonstration of a king who was never meant for God’s people.  In other words – “This is the type of king you should not have to rule over you.  See the lack of devotion he has towards Me?  He was never meant for you to begin with.”

Temple (see handout)

Take Away Points
1.    Potential discrepancy – God was displeased with Israel when they asked for a king (1 Sam. 8:6-9); Israel was warned about what a king would do to them (1 Sam. 8:10-22); God gave them Saul as a king with apparent resignation (1 Sam. 12:6-15); yet God had already been planning on giving them a king (Deut. 17:14-20).  The underlying truth of this is that God wanted them to be ruled with His king and under His conditions.  Israel wanted a king for their own reasons and under their conditions – Saul was a failure and David was God’s first true king.
2.    Israel chose a king based off of looks and appearance of strength; Saul failed.  God chose a king based off of the heart qualities; David succeeded.  The inner qualities of a man are more important than any outer qualities.
3.    All men are sinners (David and Saul).  What happens after the sin makes a big difference in one’s relationship with God.  While we are not to pursue sin or be presumptuous of God’s forgiveness, a broken and contrite heart is what God desires.  God is committed to fallen, broken, sinful people; this was displayed in the life of David.  We must not think our relationship with God is dependent upon a holy life – it is dependent upon the work of the Lord Jesus.
4.    God has always planned on being King of His people. He showed the people their own failure to rule themselves (Judges) and their need for a godly king.  David and his throne is a type foretelling the coming of Christ as the King of Kings.
5.    God dwelt with His people in the Tabernacle and Temple. There were strict conditions place on His dwelling.  With the coming of Christ and His final sacrifice of His own body for the sins of His people, God was able to now dwell inside His people – the Holy Spirit dwells in believers and the Church (the Body of Christ).  In the New Jerusalem, there will be no temple, only the glory of the Lord dwelling directly with God’s people.


Lesson 6 Handouts

January 27, 2009

Lesson 6 Handouts


Lesson 6 – For Further Reading

January 27, 2009

Prophecies of King David in Psalms
Fulfilled in Jesus Christ and His Church

1.    The Messiah would also be rejected by Gentiles.
•    Psalm 2:1 / Acts 4:25-28
2.    Political/religious leaders would conspire against the Messiah.
•    Psalm 2:2 / Matthew 26:3-4; Mark 3:6
3.    The Messiah would be King of the Jews.
•    Psalm 2:6 / John 12:12-13; 18:32
4.    The Messiah would be the Son of God.
•    Psalm 2:7a / Luke 1:31-35; Matthew 3:16-17; Hebrews 1:5-6
5.    The Messiah would reveal that He was the Son of God.
•    Psalm 2:7b / John 9:35-37
6.    The Messiah would be raised from the dead and be crowned King.
•    Psalm 2:7c    / Acts 13:30-33; Romans 1:3-4
7.    The Messiah would ask God for His inheritance.
•    Psalm 2:8a / John 17:4-24
8.    The Messiah would have complete authority over all things.
•    Psalm 2:8b / Matthew 28:18; Hebrews 1:1-2
9.    The Messiah would not acknowledge those who did not believe in Him.
•    Psalm 2:12 / John 3:36
10.    Infants would give praise to the Messiah.
•    Psalm 8:2 / Matthew 21:15-16
11.    The Messiah would have complete authority over all things.
•    Psalm 8:6 / Matthew 28:18
12.    The Messiah would be resurrected.
•    Psalm 16:8-10a / Matthew 28:6; Acts 2:25-32
13.    The Messiah’s body would not see corruption (natural decay).
•    Psalm 16:8-10b / Acts 13:35-37
14.    The Messiah would be glorified into the presence of God.
•    Psalm 16:11 / Acts 2:25-33
15.    The Messiah would come for all people.
•    Psalm 18:49 / Ephesians 3:4-6
16.    The Messiah would cry out to God.
•    Psalm 22:1a / Matthew 27:46
17.    The Messiah would be forsaken by God at His crucifixion.
•    Psalm 22:1b / Mark 15:34
18.    The Messiah would pray without ceasing before His death.
•    Psalm 22:2 / Matthew 26:38-39
19.    The Messiah would be despised and rejected by His own.
•    Psalm 22:6 / Luke 23:21-23
20.    The Messiah would be made a mockery.
•    Psalm 22:7 / Matthew 27:39
21.    Unbelievers would say to the Messiah, “He trusted in God, let Him now deliver Him.”
•    Psalm 22:8 / Matthew 27:41-43
22.    The Messiah would know His Father from childhood.
•    Psalm 22:9 / Luke 2:40
23.    The Messiah would be called by God while in the womb.
•    Psalm 22:10 / Luke 1:30-33
24.    The Messiah would be abandoned by His disciples.
•    Psalm 22:11 / Mark 14:50
25.    The Messiah would be encompassed by evil spirits.
•    Psalm 22:12-13 / Colossians 2:15
26.    The Messiah’s body would emit blood & water.
•    Psalm 22:14a / John 19:34
27.    The Messiah would be crucified.
•    Psalm 22:14b / Matthew 27:35
28.    The Messiah would thirst while dying.
•    Psalm 22:15a / John 19:28
29.    The Messiah would thirst just prior to His death.
•    Psalm 22:15b / John 19:30
30.    The Messiah would be observed by Gentiles at His crucifixion.
•    Psalm 22:16a / Luke 23:36
31.    The Messiah would be observed by Jews at His crucifixion.
•    Psalm 22:16b / Matthew 27:41-43
32.    Messiah crucified: Both the Messiah’s hands and feet would be pierced.
•    Psalm 22:16c / Matthew 27:38
33.    The Messiah’s bones would not be broken.
•    Psalm 22:17a / John 19:32-33
34.    The Messiah would be viewed by many during His crucifixion.
•    Psalm 22:17b / Luke 23:35
35.    The Messiah’s garments would be parted among the soldiers.
•    Psalm 22:18a / John 19:23-24
36.    The soldiers would cast lots for the Messiah’s clothes.
•    Psalm 22:18b / John 19:23-24
37.    The Messiah’s atonement would enable believers to receive salvation.
•    Psalm 22:22 / Hebrews 2:10-12; Matthew 12:50; John 20:14
38.    The Messiah’s enemies would stumble and fall.
•    Psalm 27:2 / John 18:3-6
39.    The Messiah would be accused by false witnesses.
•    Psalm 27:12 / Matthew 26:59-61
40.    The Messiah would cry out to God “Into thy hands I commend my spirit.”
•    Psalm 31:5 / Luke 23:46
41.    There would be many attempts to kill the Messiah.
•    Psalm 31:13 / Matthew 27:1
42.    The Messiah would have no bones broken.
•    Psalm 34:20 / John 19:32-33
43.    The Messiah would be accused by many false witnesses.
•    Psalm 35:11 / Mark 14:55-59
44.    The Messiah would be hated without cause.
•    Psalm 35:19 / John 18:19-23; 15:24-25
45.    The Messiah would be silent as a lamb before His accusers.
•    Psalm 38:13-14 / Matthew 26:62-63
46.    The Messiah would be God’s sacrificial lamb for redemption of all mankind.
•    Psalm 40:6-8a / Hebrews 10:10-13
47.    The Messiah would reveal that the Hebrew scriptures were written of Him.
•    Psalm 40:6-8b / Luke 24:44; John 5:39-40
48.    The Messiah would do God’s (His Father) will.
•    Psalm 40:7-8 / John 5:30
49.    The Messiah would not conceal His mission from believing people.
•    Psalm 40:9-10 / Luke 4:16-21
50.    The Messiah would be betrayed by one of His own disciples.
•    Psalm 41:9 / Mark 14:17-18
51.    The Messiah would communicate a message of mercy.
•    Psalm 45:2 / Luke 4:22
52.    The Messiah’s throne would be eternal.
•    Psalm 45:6-7a / Luke 1:31-33; Hebrews 1:8-9
53.    The Messiah would be God.
•    Psalm 45:6-7b / Hebrews 1:8-9
54.    The Messiah would act with righteousness.
•    Psalm 45:6-7c / John 5:30
55.    The Messiah would be betrayed by one of His own disciples.
•    Psalm 55:12-14 / Luke 22:47-48
56.    The Messiah would ascend back into heaven.
•    Psalm 68:18a / Luke 24:51; Ephesians 4:8
57.    The Messiah would give good gifts unto believing men.
•    Psalm 68:18b / Matthew 10:1; Ephesians 4:7-11
58.    The Messiah would be hated and rejected without cause.
•    Psalm 69:4 / Luke 23:13-22; John 15:24-25
59.    The Messiah would be condemned for God’s sake.
•    Psalm 69:7 / Matt. 26:65-67
60.    The Messiah would be rejected by the Jews.
•    Psalm 69:8a / John 1:11
61.    The Messiah’s very own brothers would reject Him.
•    Psalm 69:8b / John 7:3-5
62.    The Messiah would become angry due to unethical practices by the Jews in the temple.
•    Psalm 69:9a / John 2:13-17
63.    The Messiah would be condemned for God’s sake.
•    Psalm 69:9b / Romans 15:3
64.    The Messiah’s heart would be broken.
•    Psalm 69:20a / John 19:34
65.    The Messiah’s disciples would abandon Him just prior to His death.
•    Psalm 69:20b / Mark 14:33-41
66.    The Messiah would be offered gall mingled with vinegar while dying.
•    Psalm 69:21a / Matthew 27:34
67.    The Messiah would thirst while dying.
•    Psalm 69:21b / John 19:28
68.    The potters field would be uninhabited (Field of Blood).
•    Psalm 69:25 / Acts 1:16-20
69.    The Messiah would teach in parables.
•    Psalm 78:2 / Mat.13:34-35
70.    The Messiah would be exalted to the right hand of God.
•    Psalm 80:17 / Acts 5:31
71.    The Messiah would come form the lineage of David.
•    Psalm 89:3-4 / Matthew 1:1
72.    The Messiah would call God His Father.
•    Psalm 89:26 / Matthew 11:27
73.    The Messiah would be God’s only “begotten” Son.
•    Psalm 89:27 / Mark 16:6; Colossians 1:18; Revelation 1:5
74.    The Messiah would come from the lineage of David.
•    Psalm 89:29 / Matthew 1:1
75.    The Messiah would come from the lineage of David.
•    Psalm 89:35-36 / Matthew 1:1
76.    The Messiah would be eternal.
•    Psalm 102:25-27a / Revelation 1:8; Hebrews 1:10-12
77.    The Messiah would be the creator of all things.
•    Psalm 102:25-27b / John 1:3; Ephesians 3:9; Hebrews 1:10-12
78.    The Messiah would calm the stormy sea.
•    Psalm 107:28-29 / Matthew 8:24-26
79.    The Messiah would be accused by many false witnesses.
•    Psalm 109:2 / John 18:29-30
80.    The Messiah would offer up prayer for His enemies.
•    Psalm 109:4 / Luke 23:34
81.    The Messiah’s betrayer (Judas) would have a short life.
•    Psalm 109:8a / Acts 1:16-18; John 17:12
82.    The Messiah’s betrayer would be replaced by another.
•    Psalm 109:8b / Acts 1:20-26
83.    The Messiah would be mocked by many.
•    Psalm 109:25 / Mark 15:29-30
84.    The Messiah would be Lord and King.
•    Psalm 110:1a / Mat. 22:41-45
85.    The Messiah would be exalted to the right hand of God.
•    Psalm 110:1b / Mark 16:19; Mat. 22:41-46
86.    The Messiah would be a Priest after the order of Melchizedek.
•    Psalm 110:4 / Hebrews 6:17-20
87.    The Messiah would be exalted to the right hand of God.
•    Psalm 110:5 / 1 Peter 3:21-22
88.    The Messiah would be the “Stone” rejected by the builders (Jews).
•    Psalm 118:22 / Mat.21:42-43
89.    The Messiah would come in the name of the Lord.
•    Psalm 118:26 / Matthew 21:9
90.    The Messiah would come from the lineage of David.
•    Psalm 132:11 / Matthew 1:1
91.    The Messiah would come from the lineage of David.
•    Psalm 132:17 / Matthew 1:1; Luke 1:68-70

GOD’S PRESENCE – THE TABERNACLE AND THE TEMPLE
TO DAVID AND SOLOMON

God Dwelling in the Garden – God was able to walk with Adam and Eve in the Garden of Eden.  In the garden man was able to swell where he was intended: in God’s presence.  Genesis 2:8

After the Garden and Before Egypt – Due to man’s sin and rebellion, God withdrew His presence and forced man from paradise.  However, God’s intentions were to remedy the situation, only it would take years.  He chose a person, Abram, and gave him a promise (Gen. 12:1-3).  Abram would be the father of a great nation (Israel), chosen by God to bless the whole world.  This nation would be the key to God bringing mankind back into intimate relationship with Him.

The Tabernacle – After God’s chosen people left Egypt and wandered in the wilderness, God designed a place (the Tabernacle) where He would dwell with them.  It was designed by Him and would be a very Holy Place.  After the Tabernacle was made to God specifications, His glory descended as a cloud to the Holy of Holies.
1.    Specifications – Exodus 25:1-9
2.    Walls (150’ x 75’)
3.    Holy Place (15’ x 20’) – Showbread, incense, candelabra
4.    Most Holy Place (15’ x 15’) – ark (manna, Aaron’s rod, Ten Commandments)
5.    Glory of the Lord descends – Exodus 40:34-38

The Temple (David and Solomon) – After God’s people had settled in the promised land, King David desires to build a permanent structure for God’s Glory.  Instead of the Tabernacle made as a tent, David desires a Temple of stone and precious metals.  Due to David being one who shed blood, God would not allow him to build it however, David’s son was granted the privilege.  King Solomon built the Temple in Jerusalem, on the site of Mount Moriah.  This mount is mentioned as the place where Abraham attempted to sacrifice his son Isaac.  It was also the plot of land that David purchased from Ornan the Jebusite so he could set up an altar and offer burnt offerings to the Lord (1 Chron. 21:18-29).

1.    David desires to build a temple – 2 Samuel 7:1-3
2.    God promises David an eternal house – 2 Sam. 7:4-17
3.    David purchased land on Mt. Moriah to build an altar.  This would be the place of the temple.  It was also the place where Abraham attempted to sacrifice Isaac – Genesis 22; 1 Chron. 21:18-22; 2 Chron. 3:1
4.    David prevented from building the temple – his son would do it – 1 Chron. 22:5-16
5.    Solomon builds the temple – 1 Kings 6
6.    Ark and God’s presence come to the temple – 1 Kings 8
7.    Dedication of the Temple – 1 Kings 8:22-66

The Future of the Temple (its destruction and rebuilding will be studied later)

The Temple of Flesh – The New Testament speaks of Jesus as The Temple (the presence of God indwelling a human being).  It also clarifies that the Church is Christ’s body.  Therefore, the church is the New Temple –the Body of Christ and indwelt with the Holy Spirit.  In addition the Church can serve the priestly functions of the temple by offering sacrifices.  These sacrifices are a holy life.  Believers looked forward to the day when they are given a glorified body and, once again, swell face-to-face with God.  In this New Heaven and New Earth there will be no temple . . . only the glory of the Lord and His Presence!

1.    Jesus as the perfect Temple – John 2:19-20
2.    The Church as the body of Christ – 1 Corinthians 6:19-20
3.    The Church as the temple of God – 1 Cor. 6:16
4.    The Church indwelt with the Holy Spirit – Eph. 2:19-22
5.    The Church as priests offering sacrifices – 1 Peter 2:5
6.    The Church offering sacrifices – Romans 12:1-2; Hebrews 13:15-16
7.    The New Jerusalem without a temple, only the Presence of the Lord – Rev. 21:1, 22-27


Lesson 6 Video

January 27, 2009

CLICK HERE TO VIEW the video of John Geiger teaching Lesson 6 on January 25, 2009 at Eastwood Presbyterian Church, Montgomery, AL.